New York maintains strict penalties for drug possession. While some such offenses are misdemeanors, the state often classifies drug crimes as felonies. 

If you face a court date in New York for drug charges, learn more about the potential consequences of a conviction. 

Class A felony convictions 

Possession of significant amounts of certain controlled substances can result in a Class A-II felony in New York. This possession crime carries up to $50,000 in fines and between three and 10 years in prison. Minimum thresholds for this charge include: 

  • 2,880 mg of methadone 
  • 25 g of any hallucinogen 
  • 25 mg of LSD 
  • 10 g of any stimulant drug 
  • 2 oz of materials used to make methamphetamine 
  • 4 oz of any narcotic drug 

In addition, conviction for possession of 8 oz of any narcotic or 5,760 oz of methadone results in fines of up to $100,000. The prison sentence for this charge is eight to 20 years. 

Class B felony convictions 

New York imposes Class B felony charges for possession of at least: 

  • 1,250 mg PCP 
  • 1/2 oz of any narcotic drug (any amount with evidence of intent to sell) 
  • 5 g of any hallucinogen (25 mg with intent to sell) 
  • 5 mg of LSD (1 mg with intent to sell) 
  • 5 g of any stimulant drug (1 g with intent to sell) 
  • Any amount of a stimulant or hallucinogen with a prior conviction and intent to sell 

Penalties for a Class B felony conviction include up to $30,000 in fines and between one and nine years in prison. 

Class C felony convictions 

An offender can receive a Class C felony for possession of these minimum controlled substance amounts: 

  • 200 g GHB 
  • 4,000 mg ketamine 
  • 250 mg PCP (50 mg with evidence of intent to sell along with at least one prior conviction) 
  • 360 mg methadone 
  • 2 lbs of depressant drugs 
  • 10 oz of a dangerous depressant drug 
  • 1 g of a hallucinogen 
  • 1 mg LSD 
  • 1 g of a stimulant drug 
  • 2 oz of a narcotic 
  • 1/2 oz methamphetamine 

Penalties for a Class C conviction include up to $15,000 in fines and between 18 months and five years in prison. Some offenders may qualify for an alternative sentence, such as probation.